Khaled A. Beydoun

Khaled A. Beydoun


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Khaled A. Beydoun

Khaled A. Beydoun is an Associate Law Professor at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. He is also Senior Affiliated Faculty at the University of California-Berkeley Islamophobia & Research Documentation Project. He tweets @khaledbeydoun.


Khaled A. Beydoun is an Associate Law Professor at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. He is also Senior Affiliated Faculty at the University of California-Berkeley Islamophobia & Research Documentation Project. He tweets @khaledbeydoun.



ARTICLES BY Khaled A. Beydoun



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Obama’s Legacy

In 2008, Barack Obama, then a senator from Illinois, rode a wave of hope and change into the White House. He was the fir


In 2008, Barack Obama, then a senator from Illinois, rode a wave of hope and change into the White House. He was the first Black president, and energized a nation broken by a grueling trek through two challenging terms with George W. Bush as leader. In many ways, Obama was the darling of progressives across […]

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Insh’allah Bernie

The Bernie Sanders campaign came to a de facto halt after his loss in California.  However, the Sanders movement rolled


The Bernie Sanders campaign came to a de facto halt after his loss in California.  However, the Sanders movement rolled forward – finding considerable ideological, rhetorical and personnel imprints on the Democratic National Convention — which was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on July 25 through July 28.  Sanders finally endorsed Hillary Clinton, his campaign adversary, […]

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15 Years after 9/11: Where We Were, and Where We Are

“Where were you on 9/11?” This question has become ritual, particularly on the anniversary of the terror attacks tha


“Where were you on 9/11?” This question has become ritual, particularly on the anniversary of the terror attacks that permanently changed the American imagination and the national security state. However, this question has a distinct resonance with Muslim Americans — who are not only able to recount the events of that day in play-by-play fashion, […]

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Brown, Black and Blue: The Colors of Police Violence

“Police violence.” Conjoined words that read like a perfect pair, or an oxymoron, depending on racial and socioecono


“Police violence.” Conjoined words that read like a perfect pair, or an oxymoron, depending on racial and socioeconomic standing. Suburb-dwelling Americans will generally laud police, while citizens living on the margins of American cities predominantly see them as enforcers of a bleak, existential circumstance. Geography and race — which frequently overlap in America — determine […]

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If These (Prison) Walls Could Talk: Religious rights spearheaded by the Nation of Islam

“I remember you was conflicted, Misusing your influence, Sometimes I did the same.” ~ Kendrick Lamar, “To Pimp a B


“I remember you was conflicted, Misusing your influence, Sometimes I did the same.” ~ Kendrick Lamar, “To Pimp a Butterfly” ___________________________________ It was my first day in Michigan’s maximum state prison. The image of white guards lording over black inmates within and beyond gray bars colored a bleak, yet familiar picture. Whether plantation or prison, […]

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Poor and Muslim in “War on Terror” America

American Islamophobia is rising at a staggering rate. Societal and state-sponsored violence toward Muslim American commu


American Islamophobia is rising at a staggering rate. Societal and state-sponsored violence toward Muslim American communities, while embedded, is taking on new lay and legal forms. Private citizens are exacting their hatred toward Islam through “Prophet Muhammad cartoon drawing” spectacles and hate-inspired executions, while the state’s counter-radicalization (CVE) program is poised to infiltrate the most […]

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The Mourning After: Pain and Protest in Baltimore

“If you’re silent about your pain, they’ll kill you and say you enjoyed it,” wrote Zora Neale Hurston, reflectin


“If you’re silent about your pain, they’ll kill you and say you enjoyed it,” wrote Zora Neale Hurston, reflecting on the de jure segregation and iconic Civil Rights struggle of her day. Nearly half a century later, the eruption of protests in Baltimore illustrates the shrill sounds of pain, repeatedly and ruthlessly inflicted by the […]

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Fred Korematsu: An unsung “Muslim-American” Civil Rights Hero

Fred Korematsu.  A name more foreign than familiar to Muslim Americans.  Born in Oakland, California on January 30, 19


Fred Korematsu.  A name more foreign than familiar to Muslim Americans.  Born in Oakland, California on January 30, 1919, Korematsu’s American citizenship was gained through birthright.  But, his Japanese ancestry and phenotype labeled him as an alien outsider, and then as a member of an “enemy race” following the Pearl Harbor Attack on December 7, 1941. Decades before […]

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More than a Token Shift: Black and Brown Proponents of Post-Race America

“I, the man of color, want only this: That the tool never possess the man,” wrote Franz Fanon in his post-colonial o


“I, the man of color, want only this: That the tool never possess the man,” wrote Franz Fanon in his post-colonial opus, Black Skin, White Masks.  Sixty-three years after its publication, Fanon’s words are precise, poignant and prophetic, articulating the process by which black and brown Americans are no longer simply victims of racism, but […]

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Why Ferguson is Our Issue: A Letter to Muslim America

Dear Muslim America: Ferguson is your issue.   Ferguson is our issue.  For a range of reasons that go well beyond pas


Dear Muslim America: Ferguson is your issue.   Ferguson is our issue.  For a range of reasons that go well beyond passive commitment to civil rights or symbolic solidarity, Muslim-Americans are bound to Ferguson – and the shrill demand calling for an end to state-sponsored and structural violence against Black America – that reverberates from its […]